Who We Support

Marine Mammal Center

The Marine Mammal Center rescues hundreds of mammals each year. San Francisco Whale Tours offers to deliver the sea lions back to their environment. We at SFWT want to give back to the community by offering our services to take the Critters back home. Below is SFWT Owner, Captain Joe Nazar, and his good friend Pierre Lavagne, inspecting the precious cargo. Captain Joe: “When I do the releases its holy for me. It’s a humbling experience, the Marine Mammal Center is bigger than life!”

If you see a wild marine mammal that may be in distress, call 415 289-SEAL. Do not touch,pick up or feed the animal. Do not return the animal to the water. Call The Marine Mammal Center.

sf whale tours marine mammal center
Marine Science Institute

On August 20, 2009 the Marine Science Institute invited my crew and myself for a day on the water aboard the research vessel Robert G. Brownlee. We joined their summer science program with fifty school children, five crew members and one Captain. This was a day to remember. My crew and I were so amazed at their program and how they conducted their class. San Francisco Whale Tours supports the Marine Science Institute and recommends everyone give, give, give if you have the means! They are changing the world one student at time. Thanks MSI for a great day!

sf whale tours marine science
Pacific Environment

Pacific Environment’s Vessel Watch Project helps people in California experience the magic of our whales and oceans—and the threats they face from ocean noise—firsthand. They take students and concerned citizens out into the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary aboard SFWT’s boat the Kitty Kat to become the eyes and ears of the ocean.

Project Kaisei

Project Kaisei consists of a team of innovators, scientists, environmentalists, ocean lovers, sailors, and sports enthusiasts who have come together with a common purpose. To study the North Pacific Gyre and the marine debris that has collected in this oceanic region, to determine how to capture the debris and to study the possible retrieval and processing techniques that could be potentially employed to detoxify and recycle these materials into diesel fuel. This first research expedition, scheduled for the summer of 2009, will be critical to understanding the logistics that would be needed to launch future clean-up operations and testing existing technologies that have never been utilized under oceanic conditions. Learn more at www.projectkaisei.org.